Anahim/Nimpo Lake BC Header Photo
Enjoy elegance in the wilderness with Eagle's Nest Resort
Woman in a canoe photo.
Index
 Welcome to Anahim Lake & Nimpo Lake, British Columbia
  Accommodations
  Home
  Attractions
  Business Directory
  Fuel
  Regions 
  Other 

Back to Daily Blog
Archives
January 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
February 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
March 2012
Week1
Week2
April 2012
Week1
Week2
May 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
July 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
August 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
September 2012
Week1
October 2012
Week1
Week2
November 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
December 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
2011 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2011
2010 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2010
2009 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2009
2008 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2008
2007 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2007
2006 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2006
2005 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2005





Wilderness Adventures - West Chilcotin Blog

This is about a remote area in west central British Columbia, Canada called the West Chilcotin. Surrounded by numerous glacial mountain ranges, alpine lakes teeming with wild Rainbow Trout, and full of wildlife. Living here goes from no running water or electricity to spacious log homes with all the conveniences and without the smog!
If you would like to see pictures of wildlife, mountains, lakes, exciting snowmobiling, events and more, and read some great contributed stories and ongoing blogs, just go into Archives on the lower left side of this page.

Rolling over an image will give you its description.
Check out the Picture of the Day.


19/08/2012 12:20 PM

Hot, Hot, Hot!

Woo Wee, is it ever hot!
At least it is out here for us. I know, I know.... friends in Ashcroft are putting up with +38C or 100 degrees Fahrenheit while our friends in Kelowna are putting up with temperatures around the 34C or 93F mark and we're not even close, but we are definitely not used to what we are getting, no matter that it's been warm everywhere we've gone all summer and we should have adapted by now.
While Friday was supposed to be the hottest day of the year for most of central and southern British Columbia, yesterday is when we hit our highest temperature yet for the summer at 31C or 88F in the shade and with the sun covered by cloud. It only lasted for about half an hour before it dropped back down to just below 30 but I was shocked enough to see it that I actually checked two other thermometers just to make sure the first one was reading correctly.
I watched it for a little while after that and the numbers rose, then dropped again. It was as though there were bands of warm air being pushed in over the mountains or, who knows, maybe it was coming from inland. The clouds were coming from the south on the satellite map and the way the thunderheads were starting to build by late afternoon I would have sworn that we were going to get a real boomer with that kind of heat building. Disappointingly, we didn't and it turned out to be a pretty warm night with that heat trapped below the clouds. It never got below 15C or 60F during the night when all the previous nights the mercury has dropped like a stone once the sun has gone down.
We've been managing to keep the house quite cool during the hot days by opening up the house all through the night and closing it up in the mornings. Poor Andy was pretty sure he was going to suffer frostbite if it kept up so this was his warmest morning yet and he was decidedly happier as a result :-)
The sun is blazing away again today and it looks like it's building to be another barn burner. I think we have another day or so of this and then it's supposed to cool down to more normal temperatures with a mix of sun and cloud throughout most of the province through the rest of the week. It suits me. I'm headed south to Kamloops and Ashcroft to pick up a mess of vegetables and fruit for canning and since those are two of the hottest spots in the province, it would be nice if they were at a little bit more tolerable temperatures when I got there. As a result, there won't be a blog for this next week since I won't be around.
Leigh McAdam that I wrote about in the last blog sent me a link to her post about another trip she took, this time over Hunlen Falls. You've heard me write about it before from a flightseeing perspective but I really like it as seen through her eyes so with her permission, I've added some of her blog here. But to see some really stunning photos in context with her writing, I really suggest you go to her blog at
Hike, Bike, Travel after reading the following:

"Breathtaking is the only word that can remotely describe the beauty of Hunlen Falls in remote Tweedsmuir Provincial Park in the West Chilcotin area of British Columbia.
But almost no one has ever heard of Hunlen Falls – and nor do they realize that these waterfalls are Canada’s third highest – plunging 1,316 feet (401 meters). In fact they are the highest waterfalls in Canada IF you measure as a continuous unbroken drop. For comparison’s sake consider Niagara Falls. It turns out they plunge a measly 51 meters (167 feet) – give or take a few feet depending if you’re on the American or Canadian side. Granted their volume is considerably greater.
The best way to see Hunlen Falls is via floatplane. It’s a twenty minute flight from Nimpo Lake. If you have time, you can land on Turner Lake and take the one kilometer trail to the lookout. Alternatively you can hike to Hunlen Falls. But take a look at the photos and you can see how heavily treed the area is. That means there isn’t much in the way of a view until you reach the falls. That’s not my favourite type of hiking.
But should you still decide to hike here’s what you need to know:
The trail is 16.4 kilometers one way with a vertical raise of 800 meters (2625 feet). It’s a great trail if you like counting switchbacks. There are 78 of them.
Plan to take 6-9 hours one way so unless you’re a super-fast hiker, you’ll have to backpack into Turner Lake and spend the night. Backcountry fees apply – usually $5 per person per night in cash.
The trail starts at the parking lot from an old tote road twelve kilometers in from Highway 20. You need a 4X4 vehicle to access it.
Stillwater Lake, four kilometers in from the trailhead, is the last source of drinking water before you reach Turner Lake. Fill your water bottles here.
There may be a lot of trees down, especially because of deadfalls from a pine bark beetle infestation.
This area is famous for its grizzly and black bears. In fact Tweedsmuir Park recommends hiking the first three kilometers of the trail between late morning and early afternoon to avoid them.
From Turner Lake you can access several days’ worth of high alpine hiking including the Panorama Loop Trails and the trail to Ptarmigan Lake. Be sure to bring a good map and compass or GPS.
As you may have guessed this hike is rated difficult."

Thanks Leigh! Go check out her blog and in the meanwhile, since I didn't want to steal her amazing photos, I've hunted down a couple in my image bank to add over on the right. I also found a blog Leigh just posted about the Bella Coola Hill that is a must read! Aside from being hilarious, (although I'm sure she didn't feel that way while going down the Hill) it is informative and fun with some great photos of the Hill itself. Please go check it out on this link Surviving 11 Kilometers of Terror on Highway 20.
I will be back at the end of this coming week and hopefully will have a blog posted within a few days of that. I'm looking forward to my little holiday and veggie trip because we've been working pretty hard this past while trying to clear the brush from along the lake shore in front of our place and our guest cabin. The open area is just amazing now and I just can't believe we didn't notice how much of our view we had lost! I think I'm at about 14 truck loads of brush now taken to the slash pile with only one more to go after raking to finish that part of the shore line off. We haven't been able to work that long at it each day because it heats up and we're both ready to quit after only an hour or two of sweating before going on to something a little less intense. This is no weather for hard labour. Andy has had it the hardest on his knees in the thick brush with a chainsaw while I've only been dragging and loading. But I had my turn with Freddy Kruger Junior yesterday cutting small brush in the heat and was glad when I eventually ran out of fuel.
I'm impressed with how things are looking and it just might make a huge difference to the number of mosquitoes around here next year if more of the summer breezes can get into our yard. Although we don't have much in the way of wind in the summer when it's hot. It's too bad that things couldn't be reversed. Less wind in the winter when it's cold and you're facing a wind chill factor and more in the summer when you need a breeze for cooling. But Mother Nature doesn't work that way, of course.
I know one thing, I couldn't have been more wrong about predicting this summer than if I had tried. I thought surely it would be rainy this summer because it was last year and we often get two in a row. But was I ever out of whack! This is probably the longest hot spell I've ever experienced out in this country and both Andy and I remarked that it has been reminiscent of our respective childhoods when summers were long, hot and dry and seemed to go on forever. Or they did for those of us with endless chores all summer which in my family's case was fencing, haying, digging rose bushes out of the fields and picking rocks and roots off same, and packing water to farm animals when we had them. Man, I used to hate summers! I couldn't wait to go back to school!
I know, sad, isn't it?

This is the start of a new week so you'll find last week's blog at August Week Two.


Anahim Lake Highway cam looking West.




The purpose of this web site is to draw attention to a remote area of west central British Columbia. It is a beautiful area that relies heavily on tourism. The search engines don't know much about the West Chilcotin, Anahim Lake, Nimpo Lake or any of the other small communities in the region and I hope to change that! Even as large as this site will eventually be, there just isn't enough room or time in the day to fully describe this incredible country but I am going to try scraping away at the tip of the iceberg, so join me!


Follow the links, and see what the West Chilcotin is really like!
Hunlen Falls from a floatplane.
 
 
 
 
 
Going around corners and seeing Mountains from Bella Coola Hill.
 
Autumn colors and fog on Bella Coola Hill.
This web site designed by Vector North Web Design