Anahim/Nimpo Lake BC Header Photo
Wilderness Rim Resort located on Nimpo Lake is your summer vacation destination!
Woman in a canoe photo.
Index
 Welcome to Anahim Lake & Nimpo Lake, British Columbia
  Accommodations
  Home
  Attractions
  Business Directory
  Fuel
  Regions 
  Other 

Back to Daily Blog
Archives
January 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
February 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
March 2012
Week1
Week2
April 2012
Week1
Week2
May 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
July 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
August 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
Week4
September 2012
Week1
October 2012
Week1
Week2
November 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
December 2012
Week1
Week2
Week3
2011 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2011
2010 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2010
2009 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2009
2008 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2008
2007 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2007
2006 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2006
2005 Articles Starting With Last Week of December 2005





 

Wilderness Adventures - Nov., Week 3/2012

This is about a remote area in west central British Columbia, Canada called the West Chilcotin. Surrounded by numerous glacial mountain ranges, alpine lakes teeming with wild Rainbow Trout, and full of wildlife. Living here goes from no running water or electricity to spacious log homes with all the conveniences and without the smog!
If you would like to see pictures of wildlife, mountains, lakes, exciting snowmobiling, events and more, and read some great contributed stories and ongoing blogs, just go into Archives on the lower left side of this page.

Rolling over an image will give you its description.
Check out the Picture of the Day.


30/11/2012 8:15PM

Frozen Water

Our lake is pretty much frozen up everywhere except out on the Main Arm part way down the lake now.
We went for a walk the other day to see where the ice ended and the water began and it's probably a quarter of the way down the lake from our end. Today we drove down to the north end of the lake on an errand and the lake was frozen out as far as the eye could see right around the corner and to Dot Island. So that means that there isn't much left open on the Main Arm.
Andy drilled into the ice out in front of the house here and there is already five inches of ice but we've been frozen over here in this bay for some time. It looks like the lake is right on schedule to be completely frozen over by the 5th of December, which is the average date that we use. It's odd that no matter what kind of wild or calm, warm or cold summer and fall we've had, the ice on and ice off times are pretty consistent within a week or two so we haven't been too drastically affected by climate change yet.
Unlike Greenland and the Arctic.
Did anyone see the item on the news the past two days about Greenland's ice shelf melting five times faster than it did 20 years ago? According to the scientists, that translates into a 10 to 11 centimeter or 4 inch increase in ocean levels over 100 years. While they claim that is not a lot, it could increase the devastation caused by events such as hurricanes, cyclones, etc. I buy that, mainly because they know a whole lot more about it than I do. But I think they are wrong in their projection. I don't think it's going to be just a 4 inch rise in the next hundred years because I think that climate change is exponential. I believe that as the climate changes, it speeds up the change. In other words, it's the accelerator of its own process. I think that in five or ten years, scientists will come back with a much higher number and in 20 years, a higher number yet.
I believe I have mentioned before that we're avid television watchers when it comes to Discovery and History channels, and we pay particular attention to scientific shows about climate change past and present. It seems there are periods in our 'recent' past that indicate extreme climate change that may have had devastating effects on civilizations, particularly those living in a marginal agricultural environment. The Mayans come to mind. If you can follow scientific explanation, it sounds like climate change starts out slowly and then speeds up, speeds up, speeds up, until it reaches a point where it reverses itself. Perhaps a new glacial period begins. I guess we'll see. I certainly think we'll see some measurable and long term extremes in my lifetime. It will be an interesting show, that's for sure.
Global warming or general climate change, or own local weather is pretty mundane right now. Actually, it kind of sucks. It's not super cold which is nice on the one hand, but on the other, we get clear blue skies and sunshine generally when it is really cold. But it's not pleasantly warm either. It never got above -4C or 25F at the warmest part of the day and the sun never quite made it through a thick shroud of fog today. I think it was fog and not cloud because every once in a while you would see this perfect white disk trying to make its way through the grey. We didn't even go for much of a walk today, mainly because it was raw and gloomy out. Yesterday it was snowing and the sun was trying to shine at the same time which brought a little hope, but then thick cloud moved in for the afternoon and that was it. I can't wait for November to be over. Maybe once these waterways freeze up we'll finally see less fog and more sun. Wow, listen to me. Whine, whine, whine. You would think it was mosquito season!
The Dean River still has a pretty good flow coming out of Nimpo Lake which is really surprising. There was hardly any water running in the river this fall and yet it's going great guns now. Where the heck would water be melting from I wonder?
We've accumulated another half inch or inch of snow since I last wrote so while it's a little bit white everywhere, you can still get around fairly well. The snow has stayed really fluffy and light because it's been below freezing for the most part and at least that means we're not dealing with the ice everywhere that we were last year. Man, I do not know how many times I busted my heinie going down last year and I wasn't the only one. I'm glad I'm not so old yet that I could break a hip because some of those landings knocked the breath out of me!
Oh yeah, regarding the middle photo up on the right, go check out the Picture of the Day for the explanation.
25/11/2012 11:15PM

Freeze Up

Our weather has finally changed ever since the new moon. It's gotten much colder at night with temperatures dipping as low as -18C (-17C or 0F last night) and a little chilly during the day. Although at least for the last couple of days it's been rocking around freezing and a little above at the warmest part of the day and we've actually seen some sun! Friday was glorious pretty much the whole day with warm temps. Saturday we went for a walk earlier in the day than usual because it looked like there was some cloud building over the mountains. Sure enough, it had moved in and blocked the sun by the time we got back from going down to the gun range and back.
Today is amazing with sun, not a cloud in the sky and everything coated with frost reflecting back the light. It's still pretty cool out there at -9.5C or 15F but it's going to warm up fast with this sun and since there isn't a breath of wind so far, it should be a great day to get outside.
Right now the lake is making noise, sounding like a creepy 'woo woo' wind under the ice. It was frozen past the islands and right to the other shore on the Main Arm when we got up Thursday morning and presumably, it's freezing down the Arm itself now. It sounds pretty active anyway. Yesterday when we topped the little hill on our driveway a jet was going over and the noise from the lake was vying that of the jet. It sounded like someone blowing over the rim of a bottle except that it was really, really loud.
It should be pretty cool in the next week or two listening to the lake freeze up. I love the monster sounds but it changes from year to year depending on how quickly it gets cold. The faster it gets cold, the faster the ice grows, and then you just can't hear the sounds as well anymore. But we have a full moon coming up and that seems to make quite a difference too.
The last I saw of any birds was probably Tuesday morning just outside the line of ice at the island, the same two I saw in the bay the day before when there was still open water. Hopefully they've found their way out of here and on to warmer climes and at least we didn't have any birds frozen in sight of us this year, which is very much a relief. I think it must be because we had that cold spell in October and then some pretty cold nights in November before the lake started to freeze. Maybe that's the warning that clicks something in their little pea brains to get the heck out of here, because if I recall, the times that birds, particularly loons, have been frozen in here before, the weather had been reasonably warm and pleasant right up to freeze up.
We still have only a small amount of snow on the ground. Maybe two inches or so in the back woods and less in the sun. I like it that way because it makes walking so much easier and getting wood as well. Andy's been bringing it in for the past few weeks on his own but I think we'll both be going out to get some today. I'm finally done my graphics stuff so I can help for a change. We could have gone out yesterday but a pretty wild wind had kicked up by the time we came back from a walk, making it both miserable and dangerous to fall trees.
LATER
We went out for wood just after lunch today. Andy knocked down one tree that we got loaded up and the brush cleaned up, and then he knocked down a big old schoolmarm. For those of you that don't know what that is, it's a tree that has split into two trunks. The split can be up high or down low, the latter being more dangerous to fall because on occasion the tree will split apart as you are falling it and one butt can kick back. The odd person has died that way but Andy's pretty careful... most of the time. Sometimes the A type personality can get in the way. This one had the split trunks up fairly high but turned out to be a pretty big tree with a very large butt end. I was having to heave to get the last couple of blocks up onto the tailgate of the truck. But it's almost all split up and loaded into the woodshed and down under the deck so with a walk with the dogs in the back woods in there as well, it turned out to be a pretty productive day.
The sun disappeared behind cloud moving in from the west again so by the time four rolled around we were both pretty chilled. In fact, I still am. It's surprising how much heat that sun has even this time of year, and how much you miss it when it's gone. It's already -4.6C and it's not even dark yet, so it looks to be building into a cold night. How cold will depend on whether it clears off or continues to cloud over.
You can sure tell winter is moving in. It's really quiet of course. The only sound today was the sound of our chainsaw, ATV and the truck. Oh, and the odd burble from the lake. Otherwise, it's as if we're the only people that exist. It gets dark early now, (it's only 4:30 yet it's nearly dark) so with the shorter days seems to come shorter work days. In the height of summer we're both outside doing stuff all day sometimes stopping only long enough to grab something to eat, a drink of water, and off we go again. But this time of year, you kind of laze around inside doing a little of this and that waiting for it to warm up enough to go outside. Then you go out for a little while, and it's time to come back in. Andy is out mucking around a lot longer than I am during the day in winter, mainly because he's a lot more tolerant of cold than I am, but even he's usually never out for more than two or three hours. In winter, that's a work day unless we're working on projects in the house. I think that's the case for everyone here that doesn't have a full time job. You just kind of semi-hibernate. Everything slows down, including productivity. :-)
Silly as it may sound, I imagine it's been that way for most cultures through the ages. Until the industrial revolution and the rise of factories, most farming cultures probably went like hell through the summer putting in crops and putting them and their meat animals down for the winter using different storage methods. Once winter came, other than for getting wood or fuel for heat, they probably worked inside preparing leathers, patching or making clothes, repairing or making tools and weapons. But they probably didn't venture outside much other than to look after their animals. The same probably applied to nomadic cultures that may or may not have had domesticated animals to look after. They would have spent spring, summer and fall hunting, fishing and gathering, and preparing foodstuffs, furs and leathers and their abodes for the winter. Once winter comes, what else would you do? Do some hunting and gather fuel for heat but that would probably be the only outside activity. Hm. Life hasn't really changed much, has it? But now instead of everyone around a fire passing on stories, legends and the family lines of your ancestors, everyone sits around and watches TV, or they play on their X-boxes, iPads, and spend the evenings texting their friends. Or in this house, one half writes a blog so that the other half can read it. :-)
This is the start of a new week so you'll find last month's blog at November Week Two
.

Anahim Lake Highway cam looking West.




The purpose of this web site is to draw attention to a remote area of west central British Columbia. It is a beautiful area that relies heavily on tourism. The search engines don't know much about the West Chilcotin, Anahim Lake, Nimpo Lake or any of the other small communities in the region and I hope to change that! Even as large as this site will eventually be, there just isn't enough room or time in the day to fully describe this incredible country but I am going to try scraping away at the tip of the iceberg, so join me!


Follow the links, and see what the West Chilcotin is really like!
The lake frozen, sun, snow, islands.
 
A cat jumping in snow.
 
The lake frozen with snow on it, and glassy ice with no snow out to the island.
 
This web site designed by Vector North Web Design